mental health

Students are suffering — rent strikes are the solution

If you thought that the student mental health “crisis” was something of an exaggeration, let us start off with some fun statistics. According to recent research by the National Union of Students, 78% of students have experienced mental health problems in the last year. Around half of those who have experienced problems with mental health said they have difficulty completing daily tasks.

Overall, the number of students in need of… Continue reading

Courts and Mental Health – top tips for surviving the court system

It goes without saying that courts are damaging to your mental health. Cases often drag on for months and leave an ominous weight hanging over you, creating a constant source of stress. Preparing defences means reliving often traumatic instances of state violence.

There are, however, steps you can take to relieve some of the pressure of going on trial and reduce the possibility of burnout through dealing with your case.… Continue reading

Suicide rates soar as mental health funding falls

Pic: Michelle Robinson CC2.0

 

January saw Theresa May launch her vision of a “shared society” with a focus on mental health and reducing the stigma attached to it. The Prime Minister pledged new initiatives for schools and employers to provide mental health support, as well as plans for new alternatives to hospital treatment, however barely any extra funding was promised to improve already struggling mental health services, only a… Continue reading

Troubled Families Fund: Of course it failed

One of the big problems with how mental health problems are dealt with in Britain is time. Specifically, that there’s not enough spent on helping people who are suffering. For all that it’s probably the most endemic form of problem in modern society, with one in six people affected by a common mental health problem every week, the resources allocated are laughable. Campaign groups like Mind… Continue reading

Police and Mental Health: Tips for Dealing with Custody and Arrest

CN: Mental health and self harm discussed in article

There are downsides and upsides to informing the police of a mental health condition. Being in a cell is a shitty experience and if you feel unsafe you may have no choice but to tell someone. On the other hand it isn’t likely that your time in custody will be significantly shortened if you do inform the police. Some people find… Continue reading

The struggle against climate change can only happen in reality

The internet. Source wikimedia

With an ecological crisis currently at hand, there is no time to waste to fight for a health inhabitable planet. Climate scientists are warning governments that the tipping point may have past and the climate could become more volatile in decades, not centuries. James E Hansen, a retired Nasa climate scientist and director at Columbia University, said “we’re in the danger of handing young people… Continue reading

Class Conscious? The Gentrification of Revolution and the Silencing of the Working Class

You’re sitting in a bar. You are surrounded. A man is talking. Do you know what he is saying? Does he want you to know what he is saying or does he just enjoy saying it?

You pick up on words you’ve heard in passing, skimmed over in books, spent hours trying to grapple with, rip off the edge of his tongue as if he was raised with them. They… Continue reading

New Year, New We? The Dialectics of Survival in 2015

 

Today I walked the ten miles from Leamington Spa to Coventry because I had eleven pence in my pocket and the barrier guard was up and at ‘em. Eleven pence. This is my sole capital. A first class honours graduate in 2015. Though I have a roof over my head every night, I have no fixed abode and move between friends’ houses (an act of solidarity that means everything.) In the look ahead to 2015, Novara Media’s Aaron Bastani paints a grim picture for Britain as a whole over the next twelve months. I want to portray a more personal understanding of that reality, alienation and anxiety that five years of austerity have created.

 

In previous articles I’ve focused on my mental illnesses, and I am still trying to understand how they are connected intrinsically to contradictions within capitalism. There is a very raw dialectical nature to the way that mental illness is not only treated in our society but consumed and experienced too. I suffer from severe depression, bouts of dissociation and what for now remains to be a self-diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder. This helps to explain an addictive personality and my inability to maintain relationships. But how much of this comes from a historical background of unstable family and acute poverty? How much of this comes from the impossible expectations upon myself under the age of austerity? Continue reading

Burn Up, Don’t Burn Out: Mental Health and Freedom.

Last week, I documented the events at Warwick Uni and the police brutality that followed a peaceful sit in. This week, as a continuation of those events I want to try to present an understanding of how these attacks are made to deter us, not only through fear but through trauma and helplessness.

 

Every activist is at some point in their trials made acutely aware of burn out; the moment at which the fight to change society infringes on your own mental health. Recently, I’ve been experiencing that tension. It is, with little exaggeration, a process of consumption. You balance between the urge to continue the fight and the separate urges that you turn inwards against yourself.

This morning I went to see the doctor. Since my arrest at the Warwick demo, I have seen an increase in anxiety, I’ve been suicidal and I’ve struggled to maintain a serious balance in my relationships. I shake and sweat at night and I dream about losing my sight through violent means. He changed my meds and sent me on my way. Continue reading