BLOOD AH GO RUN

1981, 2017, 2020 In the 39 years since Menelik Shabazz documented the Black People’s Day of Action in the aftermath of the New Cross massacre, in his seminal documentary ‘Blood ah go Run’, what has changed for Black British people? Black and brown people still perish by flame; as we witnessed in the abject events

International Non-Binary People’s Day and the Struggle for Wider Revolution

International Non-Binary People’s Day fell on Tuesday 14th July this year, and much like all days and weeks and months for the queer community, social media sites were flooded with colourful illustrations and impactful personal reflections relating to the non-binary experience. It wasn’t my initial plan to write about this day, but as I realised

Bristol: city council seeks prosecution of slave trader’s statue-topplers

The Bristol City Council have formally reported the toppling of the slave trader Edward Colston’s statue as criminal damage, triggering a police investigation into the matter. Today, the cops released images of individuals they wish to speak with in relation to the direct action from 7th June, when, during a Black Lives Matter protest, the

‘Something has changed in the power dynamic’: interviews with anarchists from Minneapolis and NYC

On 25 May George Floyd was murdered by police in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This immediately resulted in protests on the streets in half a dozen cities in the United States. By the end of that week, every city in the United States – and many around the world – saw vocal, determined, well-attended demonstrations to make

Police Killings and the Settler State

In a new article for Freedom written following anti-racist protests which have reverberated around the globe, Peter Gelderloos considers how history acts to inflect today’s racism in the US, UK and settler colonial states worldwide. As many people have pointed out in the weeks of international revolt that have spread outwards from Minneapolis since the

E.A.Z: the Everyday Autonomous Zone

One of the most beautiful banners I ever saw was designed by a working-class activist named Af. He had previously worked at a brickyard in Maltby, but one payday he cashed in his wages and used them to travel around India for six months. Upon his return he became the ‘Guru of Norfolk Park’. Norfolk