Anarchist farm: a revolutionary feast

Food — or the potential lack of it — has played on a lot of people’s minds lately. The government’s mixed-messages, misinformation and pointless power-play with regard to the coronavirus pandemic led to fear-induced panic-buying which highlighted the weakness of ‘just in time’ supply chains; which are, of course, designed to maximise profit rather than

Orwell among the anarchists

Vernon, Richards George Orwell at Home (and Among the Anarchists): Essays and Photographs, (1998) London: Freedom Press. Photographs by Vernon Richards. Essays by Vernon Richards, Colin Ward, and Nicholas Walter. Review by Raymond S. Solomon There are few people who had the knowledge and understanding of George Orwell as did the three contributors to George

Moving with the times … but not in step

Colin Ward critiques an interview from New Left Review of Alan Lovell, a regular Peace News writer in the 1960s and a member of the Committee of 100, by Stuart Hall and Paddy Whannel, looking at how anarchism was perceived within the group. It was first published in Anarchy Number 3, May 1961. Three conceptions of anarchism emerge

Augustus John — an appreciation

WHEN AUGUSTUS JOHN DIED at the age of 83 on October 31st 1961, the newspapers were full of such adjectives as “boisterous, blustering, brilliant” (Daily Herald) and “robust, swashbuckling, romantic” (The Times). Those who saw him as a grave and courteous old gentleman, who, though he was the finest draughtsman this country has produced, was

Industrial decentralisation and workers’ control

This piece by Colin Ward is the text of a paper read to the anti-war Committee of 100 seminar at Kensington Central Library on November 20th, 1961. The seminar is a pilot course for the Committee’s “Schools for Non-violence.” THE COMMITTEE OF 100, in convening this series of meetings and in linking the current protests